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Let’s say you experience a positive situation, you see a friend you haven’t met in a long time, or your child does something hilarious. Neuronal signals travel from the cortex of your brain to the brainstem (the oldest part of our brains). From there, the cranial muscle carries the signal further towards the smiling muscles in your face. And that’s only where it starts. Once the smiling muscles in our face contract, there is a positive feedback loop that now goes back to the brain and reinforces our feeling of joy. 

Smiling gives us the same happiness that exercise induces in terms of how our brain responds. Infact smiling stimulates our brain's reward mechanisms in a way that even chocolate, a well-regarded pleasure -inducer, cannot match! Our brain feels good and tells us to smile, we smile and tell our brain it feels good and so forth. 

Find out more about the science of smiling from this article add 'Smiling More' to your list of 2015 resolutions! 

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